Author Archive

Have you functioned in a dynamic online community under an avatar identity for multiple years?  Do/did you operate, or recognize the possibility that you could have operated differently in that community than you do in the physical world?  Have you ever consciously withheld information about your activity in that online community from the inhabitants of the physical world?

If you answered “yes” to those questions, like me, you may have also unknowingly experienced a strange phenomenon which I am about to describe.

(more…)

Car mechanics and enthusiasts speak a complex language which the average driver doesn’t comprehend.  Computer developers can do incredible things with code—things most computer users don’t even begin to understand. And, perhaps most importantly for our purposes, gamers have their own complex languages—languages which can sound ridiculous to non-gamers.

Acquiring expertise in these languages requires being immersed in their respective environments.  In order to be a mechanic, one must understand the parts of cars and how they interact.  In order to be a developer, one must have mastered coding languages such as HTML, javascript, etc… and know how they interact.  In order to thrive in a game’s environment, players must learn it’s language.

(more…)

I think we’re getting into the ever-present, ever-frustrating topic of corporate influence on game development. Maybe it’s a copout, but I can see how “Good AI” development can be pricey and thereby unappealing to developers (specifically development firms) driven by profit. As much as I would argue that games are someone’s or a group of people’s works of art, I do recognize a significant difference between artists in the traditional sense and game developers: money. Even the most famous of traditional artists starved, often surviving only on their love for what they did. Please do correct me if I’m wrong, but I at least have the impression that there are few if any starving artists in the game development community who would have enough passion and resources to invest the time and money in developing better AI, not knowing beyond a shadow of a doubt that it would make them rich.

However, the above is my belief related to the development of a perfect (or close to perfect) single artificial entity, a bot. Because of corporate interests and the easy alternatives that Twitchdoctor pointed out, I don’t think we will see development companies focusing on making the bots in their games ‘think’ rather than simply giving them more health, stronger weapons, better aim, and of course, more grenades. Twitchdoctor’s post (Good AI, Bad AI) presents a powerful alternative to adjusting the bots though—changing the conditions of the game. As in Twitchdoctor’s example of Thief, the conditions of the game can be changed to accommodate difficulty increase and substitute for (or at least distract from) imperfect AI.

(more…)